Harvesting Tobacco


Adult responsibilities harvesting tobacco leaves

ADULTS NEED TO MAKE SURE:

 

  • Re-entry standards are followed
  • Tobacco plants are dry
  • Child has safe transport to the field
  • Work area has no hazards
  • Child has no insect allergies
  • Child wears long sleeved shirt, long pants, wide brimmed hat, sunglasses and sunscreen
  • Child and adult can communicate by cell phone, walkie-talkies or other method
  • Break areas are provided away from the work site with bathrooms and water for drinking and washing hands
  • Child has at least one ten-minute break every hour
  • Child drinks a quart of fluids every hour
  • Child changes outer clothing and washes hands after job

 

 

 

 

Main Hazards

sharp tool pierced fingertouching leaves repetitive picking motion
Sharp tools can cut skin Contact with wet tobacco
leaves can lead to green
tobacco sickness
Repetitive motion can
strain muscles and injure
back and joints

Remember

hand washingprotective bootsleather gloves
Good handwashing Bite-proof protective
boot with non-skid
soles
Leather/moisture resistant
gloves
 

Can your child do this job?

ABILITY

Can the child bend and lift safely? (See “Bending”/“Lifting”)
Yes.
No. STOP! Children must be able to bend and lift correctly to do this job safely.

If using cutting tools, are they the right size for the child?
Yes.
No. STOP! The wrong size tools can cause injury.

Do the tobacco sticks weigh less than 10-15% of the child’s body weight?
Yes.
No. CAUTION! Tobacco sticks should be lifted in smaller numbers or an adult should lift the tobacco sticks.

Does the child have to carry the tobacco sticks less than 10-15 yards?
Yes.
No. CAUTION! Tobacco sticks should be lifted in smaller numbers or an adult should lift the tobacco sticks.

Can the child repeat a manual procedure for 50 minutes without becoming exhausted?
Yes.
No. STOP! Good eye-hand coordination is needed to prevent injury.

Is your child responsible? Do you trust your child to do what’s expected without anyone checking?
Yes.
No. STOP! Irresponsible behavior can lead to injury.

Does the child do things that seem dangerous for the thrill of it?
Yes. STOP! Children who take risks or behave dangerously are more likely to be injured.
No.

 

TRAINING

If using cutting and spearing tools, has the child been trained to use them safely?
Yes.
No. STOP! Training is needed to prevent injury.

Has an adult demonstrated harvesting tobacco on site?
Yes.
No. STOP! Children learn best when shown how to do the job at the work site.

Has the child shown he or she can do the job safely 4 to 5 times under close supervision?
Yes.
No. CAUTION! An adult must watch constantly until the child shows he or she can do the job.

 

SUPERVISION

Can an adult supervise as recommended?
Yes.
No. STOP! The right level of supervision is key to preventing injuries.

 

Supervision

What's the right amount? Here are suggestions- but remember, it depends on the child.

Harvesting leaves:

Age 12-13: WATCH constantly at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, CHECK every few minutes.

Age 14-15: When the child shows he or she can do the job, LEAVE for 15 to 30 minutes, then make sure the child is bending and lifting correctly and not showing signs of fatigue.

Harvesting whole plants:

Age 14-15:
WATCH nearly constantly at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, CHECK every few minutes.

Age 16+:
CHECK every few minutes at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, LEAVE for 15 to 30 minutes.

 


 


ng logo

North American Guidelines
for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT)

For more information, visit: http://www.nagcat.org

 

ncc logo

National Children's Center for Rural and
Agricultural Health and Safety
Marshfield Clinic
1000 North Oak Avenue
Marshfield, WI 54449-5790
Phone: 1-800-662-6900 or 715-389-4999
Fax: 715-389-4996

 

nfm logo

National Farm Medicine Center
Marshfield Clinic
1000 North Oak Avenue
Marshfield, WI 54449-5790
Phone: 1.800.662.6900 or 715.389.4999
Fax: 715.389.3535

 

 

 


Disclaimer and Reproduction Information: Information in NASD does not represent NIOSH policy. Information included in NASD appears by permission of the author and/or copyright holder. More

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